The People that Time Forgot, by Edgar Rice Burroughs 2/157 | Previous page | Next page |

The People that Time Forgot, by Edgar Rice Burroughs


from Honolulu had brought information of the date of the expected

sailing of his yacht _Toreador_, which was now twenty-four hours

overdue. Mr. Tyler’s assistant secretary, who had been left

at home, assured me that there was no doubt but that the _Toreador_

had sailed as promised, since he knew his employer well enough to

be positive that nothing short of an act of God would prevent his

doing what he had planned to do. I was also aware of the fact

that the sending apparatus of the _Toreador’s_ wireless equipment was

sealed, and that it would only be used in event of dire necessity.

There was, therefore, nothing to do but wait, and we waited.

We discussed the manuscript and hazarded guesses concerning it and

the strange events it narrated. The torpedoing of the liner upon

which Bowen J. Tyler, Jr., had taken passage for France to join

the American Ambulance was a well-known fact, and I had further

substantiated by wire to the New York office of the owners, that

a Miss La Rue had been booked for passage. Further, neither she

nor Bowen had been mentioned among the list of survivors; nor had

the body of either of them been recovered.

Their rescue by the English tug was entirely probable; the capture

of the enemy U-33 by the tug’s crew was not beyond the range

of possibility; and their adventures during the perilous cruise

which the treachery and deceit of Benson extended until they found

The People that Time Forgot, by Edgar Rice Burroughs 2/157 | Previous page | Next page |

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